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One year later, Keystone spills 210,000 gallons of oil.🔷

After mass protests opposing Keystone in 2016, the pipeline leaks 210,000 gallons oil. More damage is done to the environment and the people of South Dakota.


Another bad decision for the environment by elected officials in Nebraska: they have approved the extended Keystone XL pipeline through their state. Last Thursday, the TransCanada Keystone pipeline spilled 210,000 gallons of oil in South Dakota.

If you remember, this time last year there was a massive protest opposing the Keystone pipeline because of the damaging environmental effects. Not only that, Native Americans and environmentalist were treated inhumanely by our own government, being sprayed with cold water at sub-freezing temperature, shot with rubber bullets and being forced to tear down their camps.

The decision by Nebraska and the recent oil spill from Keystone is an example of how our government completely fails to listen to the people and support corporations instead for short-term profits, ignoring the long-term damaging effect the pipeline will have on our environment.

The Keystone pipeline spill, one year later, is an 'I told you so' from the Native Americans and environmentalist to our government and TransCanada. However, to the people of South Dakota and the Sioux tribe, the approval by Nebraska to extend the Keystone XL is a 'We don’t care', because they will be stuck with the environmental aftermath of the spill.

“Thousands of protesters opposed the planned route because it shuttled the pipeline under Lake Oahe on the Missouri River, a burial site sacred to the Standing Rock Sioux and a major source of drinking water for the community. If the proposed pipeline were built under the lake, and it leaked, potentially millions of gallons of oil could contaminate the Missouri River.” - Business Insider.

There is no greater satisfaction than telling people 'I told you so' and watching their reactions. But the protestors-environmentalists and Native Americans are distraught about the leak from Keystone when the government should not have allowed it to be built. Not only that, the decision for Nebraska approving the Keystone XL pipeline illustrates local elected officials purposely ignoring the effects of the damage of leaks from pipelines in our environment, specifically in their State where the people will suffer in the long term because of the chemicals absorbed in the environment.

“In most cases, cleanup of pipeline spills is only partially successful, leaving tens of thousands of barrels of oil on our land or in our water. On average, the government's data show that more than 31,000 barrels of oil or other substances are not cleaned up following pipeline incidents, and in some years many more barrels are left, polluting our environment for years to come,” the Center of Biological Diversity explained.

The Keystone Pipeline leaked and the haphazard cleanup will take place. However, the leak of the oil is not only in the lake but it is also in the land where people live and farm. They too will be affected. It is extremely distressing that the people of South Dakota are going through this and more disappointing that Nebraska continues to approve the pipeline even though it is harmful to the people and the environment.

The harm caused by the pipelines not only to our environment but also to the people should be enough for our elected officials to forgo the short-term profits and focus on the long-term of the environment and the people. Unfortunately, the Nebraska decision approving the extended Keystone XL pipeline shows it is still the profit that matters most.🔷


(Cover: Flickr / shannonpatrick17 - The TransCanada Keystone Oil Pipeline, Saline, Nebraska, United States.)


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An avid political junkie, who eat, sleeps, breaths and lives politics. As a result, I created my blog Eve's Politics.
Atlanta, Georgia, USA Website