The Metropolitan Police keep on warning us about the dangers of the far-right, yet certain ‘academics’ continue to claim it is non-existent. We need to stop normalising them.


First published in January 2021.


Last week felt like a significant moment in history.

Waking up the next day I had the depressing realisation that it really wasn’t. We have normalised and pandered to the far-right and populists for so long that they honestly believe they are owed power.

We amplify the voices of a tiny minority of pundits to such a point that they, and their supporters, honestly believe that they are the majority. Rather than the evidence which shows that they are actually a small number of very angry shouty people.

I don’t think necessarily we will see scenes like those that night in Washington D.C. replicated in the UK. That doesn’t mean we won’t see populists becoming increasingly emboldened in their actions because they can’t believe that they aren’t actually the voice of the majority.

Only a few years ago a far-right terrorist murdered an MP in plain sight because of the words of so-called “legitimate voices”. Only a matter of months ago a lawyer was attacked by a far-right activist with a knife because of the word of the Home Secretary.

Priti Patel. | Number 10

The Metropolitan Police continue to warn about the dangers of the far-right, yet certain ‘academics’ continue to claim it is non-existent. We are constantly told that we need to engage with people to “prevent them moving further to the right”. Engaging doesn’t mean pandering though.

The far-right and extremists are in minority, but a very vocal minority, despite their claims of being silenced. They also have a lot of tacit support from those viewed as “legitimate voices”.

We, and that’s across the political spectrum, need to stop normalising them.🔷




Dan Sohege, Human rights advocate, international refugee law specialist, immigration economist, charity fundraising professional and Director of Stand For All.


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🗳️ Priti Patel







[This piece was first published as a Twitter thread and turned into the above article on 10 January 2021 with the purpose of reaching a larger audience. It has been minorly edited and corrected, and published with the author’s consent. | The author of the tweets writes in a personal capacity.]

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